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Net Neutrality is a political hot button that is used to divided our nation even further. While we don’t want to get into the Republican vs Democrats points, what is critical is that this issue can cause Indie Authors, and even small press Authors to lose valuable sales.

With internet providers now being able to charge both the providers of content as well as those who receive the content, this gives them the ability to manipulate what you see. Not only is this a free Speech issue, but it also relates to if and how an Authors website is viewed. The providers can charge each individual website an extra fee to be able to be delivered to homes at the normal speed, and if you don’t pay, then you get downgraded to a slower speed, which let’s face it, this means the person downloading an authors site will give up waiting for it and move on. That means YOU LOSE!

In addition, the provider can charge more for a site to speed through their system and be delivered quickly and effortlessly. This, then gets passed on to the users of that system, such as Amazon sellers. More cuts into the profit margin of Authors and sellers.

This is BAD for everyone with higher costs to promote their products, means higher cost to purchase their products. Net neutrality from our perspective as small businesses is bad for everyone: Buyers and Sellers.

Publishers Weekly encouraging publishers to step up and fight the change that was implemented by the FCC last month. We encourage you as small businesses to step up and let your Congressmen know how it will affect you.

Below is an article that appeared in Publishers Weekly encouraging publishers to step up and fight the change that was implemented by the FCC last month. We encourage you as small businesses to step up and let your Congressmen know how it will affect you.

It’s Time for Publishers to Join the Fight for Net Neutrality

by Publishers Weekly | Jan 19, 2018

Supporters of net neutrality marked two important developments in recent days. On Tuesday, January 16, it was revealed that 50 senators have now committed to a bill that would block the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December repeal of net neutrality rules. In addition, as the New York Times reported, more than 20 states have now begun a battle in the courts to block the FCC’s repeal.

Codified by the FCC in 2015, net neutrality rules were created to keep Internet service providers from favoring certain websites or content over others. But, as the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Corynne McSherry explains, the FCC’s repeal last month now paves the way “for an Internet that works more like cable television;” a “pay-for-play” system where content providers could be forced to “negotiate with multiple ISPs to avoid their content being buried, degraded, or even blocked.”

Polls and public comments show the move to repeal net neutrality is broadly unpopular. It is also potentially dangerous. In comments to the FCC, a coalition of the nation’s top library associations stressed that preserving an open Internet is “essential to our nation’s freedom of speech.” And, in a letter to the FCC, 1,838 members of the Authors Guild demonstrated that American authors also unequivocally recognize the danger of the FCC’s action.

“As authors, we rely on the Internet to make our voices heard,” the guild letter states, concluding that the FCC’s repeal of net neutrality protections “will harm the free speech of American writers.”

But a key voice remains noticeably absent from the net neutrality debate: publishers. Despite widely expressed concerns that the FCC’s action could negatively impact free speech, and in contrast to concerted efforts to preserve net neutrality by others in the publishing ecosystem—including the library community, authors groups, and dozens of media and public advocacy organizations, including PEN America—the Association of American Publishers has yet to release a single statement on the issue and has taken no formal position.

We recognize that publishers and the AAP have limited resources and must prioritize the issues they choose to take on. However, supporting free speech is one of the AAP’s core policy areas. Which is why publishers can no longer sit this one out.

Following the FCC’s repeal, restoring net neutrality protections is going to be an uphill political battle. But it is not too late for publishers to stand up for free speech, and to stand with their readers, their authors, and the library community.

With the battle headed to Congress, now is the time to make that stand. AAP president and CEO Maria Pallante is widely known for her policy acumen and her relationships in Congress. And as widely recognized champions of free speech, a strong, unified statement from America’s book publishers can make a critical difference.

 

There is no doubt that the world has gone crazy with Social Media. It can be a great tool that supports people, businesses, and even authors, but it also has the power to hurt. A challenging aspect of Social Media is when authors tell the world about something doesn’t work for them and then determines that it will not work for others. This kind of dialogue can not only damage a fellow author but set a negative tone against the author who wrote it.

We run into this issue a great deal when we send out notices about a program or app that we’ve tried and does or doesn’t work for us. We do this only after testing it thoroughly. And as with anything, the results that we arrived at, may or may not work for someone else.

However, this is where reviews of products come in handy, and we encourage YOU the membership, to share your comments about a program, event, etc. and let other authors know what YOUR results are. Your honest review can help another author determine if that program, event, company, or app will work for them.

We also read and follow various journals and programs to stay on top of new trends to help guide the membership, so they can use Social Media to the best of their ability.

There is a move to become less engaged in Social Media with Facebook and Twitter being the ones hit the hardest, as they have been around the longest. Also, they are the ones that have the most users compared to the other 300 plus systems out there.

One of our goals as TxAuthors is to create a Social Media system designed specifically for authors and readers as a part of our overall program to be more creative, independent and supportive of authors in general. However, this is also a costly endeavor that may not happen soon enough.

Keep in mind that people are drawn to what they like, including what type of books they read. For this reason, what may work for one author may not work for another. So, just be careful when you are on Social Media and make a blanket comment about whether something is good or not as the ‘final and only’ go-to factor. Remember, you are unique, and your results are related to You and not someone else.

You Work Hard for Your Books Sales, Don't Waste Your Money

UPDATE - Info about Commun.It has been added sinc ethe publication of the original blog.

Commun.It- Recently Commun.it has changed their polices that better fit their financial needs and not yours. For anyone who has been with them for a period of time, you would probably not notice the change. For new people, hopefully you caught the change.

Commun.It is set up as either a free service to gain followers, or as a paid service. As a free service, they will send out tweets and postings from your account without your notice and or approval. What is wrong with this is that your account can be sending out tweets and postings of other companies and people that you may not agree with, support, or even want listed on your feed. This can damage your reputation and your brand.

If you want them to stop sending out the tweets/postings, they want you to upgrade to their service for a hefty monthly fee. This is a form of blackmail. If you send a request for them to stop, they will discontinue your account immediately. There is no middle ground with them.

Therefore, unless you are comfortable with them sending out tweets/postings under your name, that you have not approved, cancel your account and advise them why.

What little service you get from them finding you followers, is not that great, nor of value to pay a monthly fee for their services.

With our partnership with Texas Authors, Inc., will test out products and services to see if they have value in promoting or selling your book. This is the current list of companies that we do not recommend and the reasons why. There is no need for you to waste your money and get little to no results promoting your book(s).

It should be noted that this is based on our use of their program, and each person may have the same or different results. We post this on our site to help you to be more educated in how you spend your money.

GoRead.com – Why pay $30+ a month to promote a website book store that doesn’t promote you? True, an 80% commission is great, but will you sell thousands of books over a year to justify the expense. Plus, they have top selling books on their site, so all the promotion to them only adds to their sales of everyone else’s books, including best sellers…again, how does that help you?

Authors Uproar – their website is incomplete and full of ‘additional’ products you don’t need. AwsomeBookPromotion.com – Operates several websites that you pay to have your book promoted. The AwsomeGang promotion lumps you into a list of books being promoted via email, so you get lost in the shuffle and there is not a set genre for each email. It’s anything and everything in the mix.

BookShout is another book promotion email program that promotes more than one book in their email.

If you pay for book promotion you should be the only book promoted either in that email or in that twitter moment. A link should be going directly to a page where they can see and read more about your book and then purchase directly from that site. If you are one of several books, then people will skip over you and you have wasted your money. In addition, the email that your book is listed in should be for books in your same genre, not books from every genre, or a group of books from one genre that has absolutely nothing to do with your book.