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by LEONARD TILLERMAN: Author, Book Blogger, Book Reviewer and Shared by M.J. Rocissono

You have just completed writing a virtual masterpiece! The words flow beautifully and seamlessly throughout the story. The setting description is truly magnificent and your characters are developed so well that they actually feel as if they are part of the family! There is no doubt about it…you have a winner on your hands! Or do you? The cruel truth is that writing that wonderful story is only part of what an indie author must do. To be successful and self-sufficient in this industry, they need to be expert book marketers as well. Otherwise their masterpiece will remain buried in boxes only seeing the light of day when a sympathetic family member picks it up for a read.

So how does an indie author most effectively market their book? Marketing is not most writers’ strong suit, after all, for it is not writing! This is why it is especially hard for indie authors to market their own books seeing as they have to take advantage of their own book promotion and marketing skills as well as their social connections. However, in reality your book is as good as useless if you do not promote and market it accordingly. Marketing involves interacting with potential readers for an author and this means you will have to put your book out there first. Your biggest possible fan might never know about your book if you do not market it for him or her to discover and share with others. So how do you actually do this?

First, make sure you have covered the basics when it comes to your book writing.

Is Your Book Any Good?

This is definitely subjective but the question is in reference to the topic or story at hand. Is it worth reading? Is your book interesting? Did you make use of beta readers to offer feedback on whether concerning the question? If not, then there is no way to know whether your book is any good. As an indie author, you also need to have independent feedback about your book because you cannot be the judge of your own work. A good book should develop with time following the first draft and this process only works with criticism and external suggestions. Although it is usually a good idea, you do not always need to spend money on a professional editor. However, for your book to be any good, you do absolutely require external input to help you refine and polish your manuscript before publishing it. If your draft is riddled with mistakes and is still in rough then the chances are it will not sell and if it does then it will not something to write home about.

Can the Book Bring In Potential Readers?

If you made your own book cover or attempted to do so, it probably will not look as attractive as you expected unless you are skilled in Photoshop and Book cover design. If this is not the case then you are better off hiring a professional to do it. Your book cover is one of the main promotional instruments at your disposal so you should make sure it is one of your best features. Your book does not stand a chance without an awesome cover because an amateur, boring, dull, and flat cover will kill your sales.

How is Your Book Description? Can it Attract Buyers?

The book description is another critical element of your book marketing strategy following your book cover. It will help to drive sales by attracting potential readers. If it is written poorly then this will hurt your chances of gaining buyers. Dedicate sufficient time to writing a genuinely sensational book description. Research on the features of an efficient book description and get to work on creating a few versions. Get external feedback to determine the best one and go with that one.

After covering these three sections, then you can start thinking further about your marketing strategy.

Determining Your Target Readers and Where They Are

Each book has its own target reader, which is why marketing your book generically and widely is a waste of your much-needed money and time. Instead of doing this focus on narrowing down on your target audience by determining shared demographic profiles, interests, and values. Write up a profile describing your ideal reader. Determine where they spend most of their time, the groups they associate with, the websites they visit most, the movies they like, and the magazines or books they read. A list of these things will be useful to you later. Next, try to put yourself in the reader’s shoes at each point of your marketing strategy. Every marketing action or decision you take should be preceded by asking yourself how it will be taken by your target reader. Marketing decisions should never be considered elements of your artistic self-expression but the communication of values in an effective manner. You will need to channel your work into the interests and values of the target consumer.

Maintain Professionalism Throughout

Stay away from anything that appears amateurish in your production values, editing, and writing. Essentially, your book is going up against many other books from popular authors backed by major publishers to gain your target reader’s purchasing dollars, consideration, and attention. For this reason, you should make your readers feel like you are equally as professional as your adversaries are. This goes back to the 3 elements of book writing mentioned above. Make sure your writing is impeccable by working to keep learning and improving. Take the time to do things the right way instead of rushing to publish your work. Making Sure Your Blog/ Website Gains Traffic

One of the best ways to market your book is by obtaining traffic from Bing or Google searches. Readers who land on your site via search engine results have a higher likelihood of showing interest in your themes, genre, or book topic. After all, these will be the factors they are looking for and thus how they locate you. In order to get significant search traffic, your blog or website needs to have a .com address. Having a website is almost as important as making sure it is updated regularly, and well-designed in an effort to promote your book. If your blog posts are well-written, they will be indexed by Google and hopefully, this will bring most visitors to your site organically. This is very beneficial for book promotion because this way people will get to discover your books and you as an author. Social Media

You simply must use social media to promote your work for your own good. However, being the significant time consumer it is, you must take care to use it appropriately if you want to write books and sell them. Restrict social media exposure to a few popular sites like Pinterest, Twitter, or Facebook. Most authors only need a Goodreads page, a Twitter account, and a Facebook page as the main social media platforms to promote their books. Google Plus, Medium, and Instagram are also popular. Spending most of your time posting links for people to buy your books will only end up repelling people. Instead, use your social media platforms to inform people, reply to comments or questions, and connect with your audience. If you do it right, you will attract followers in the process. Use it as a means of spreading your name and not advertising your books continually. Make your social media network bigger every day by expanding your reach, making friends, and following people. Building your social media presence on a couple of sites is better than doing so on every single one out there. Using image links frequently can also bring about an improved click-through rate on social media for your blog post and book promotion.

Get to Know How to Link Properly

As an Indie author, you should master how to create links and use them. This includes learning how to use Book promotion links, using Book Buy links in the best way, and embedding Links into images and text. Proper use of links to your blog articles and your books is imperative in effectively promoting your work and your content.

Use Amazon to Your Advantage

As a self-publishing author, a big chunk of the income from your sales will come initially from Kindle eBooks and Amazon. Amazon can be a very effective tool in helping to promote your book so you should take advantage of this by choosing and using the best keywords and categories to make sure your book can be discovered easily. To increase your chances of search exposure, you may want to publish in both Kindle eBook and paperback so that you can use various keywords and categories for both versions. Should you enroll in KDP select then ensure you make use of the extra promotional advantages allowed by Amazon. Use the free book days, put up countdown deals, and use Amazon Ads if your budget allows it. Pricing Your Book Strategically Several Indie authors have gained success by running sales on their eBooks on a temporary basis and even setting their book price at free for a certain period. This approach can help to create significant visibility for your work and develop your fan base quickly. If you apply this to one book in a continuing series of books, you can bring in more readers who will be prompted to buy the rest of the books. Think again like the target reader. If you price your book too low then the reader will probably assume it is cheap because the quality is low and if the pricing is too high and you are not a household name then you will lose out on sales. Consider that eBook pricing also influences your royalties based on which platform you are using to distribute it.

Spreading the Word

Look for services or sites that can help you promote your book. However, you may get free sites that do not offer worthwhile services that you would have gotten by spending just a bit elsewhere. The best way to approach it is by using both means, but ensuring you are selective in the book promotion services you opt to use. Just because an author spends a lot of money on their book promotion, it does not necessarily mean they will gain sales especially if their content is not any good as highlighted above.

Reach Out to Book Reviews and Book Bloggers

I have saved what I personally consider one of the best strategies for last. Obtaining good book reviews for your work is an imperative part of successful book marketing. Book reviews help to establish an author’s overall reputation. An author’s book will benefit significantly from book reviews in addition to their author status. A book review, and a positive one at that, is proof and reassurance for anyone looking to buy an author’s book that it is the best quality and worth buying. Most readers trust third-party reviews more than other sources because they usually have more credibility. This is something an author should place highly in their book sale process. Book reviews are a form of organic marketing for an author’s books. Word of mouth as a form of promotion is quite effective. A positive, or better yet a glowing book review, can make one reader recommend it to others. You can trust a typical reader to buy a book, particularly from an independent or first-time author, if they see that it has been bought and reviewed positively by other readers. If a book has more satisfied readers, there is a higher likelihood that it will be recommended to new readers. Book marketing at its best!

Conclusion

There can be little doubt that book marketing is no easy feat! It requires a lot of effort, time and perseverance. It also demands that a sound strategy be in place. It is critically important that this plan has started before your book is completed. You will need to spread the word and get potential customers excited about your upcoming work. Does the term “Coming Soon” ring a bell? Marketers and advertisers use this all the time when promoting products, films and books! Yes… book marketing can take a lot of time away from your actual writing. However, you are an indie author…you have chosen this path. Make sure that you are successfully marketing your book so others can see how great an author you really are!

 

Does Giving Away Free Books Build Your Audience?

Published by Rick Lite on October 1, 2017

When most authors think about giving away free books, they do so in hopes of increasing their following and reviews. This topic has become an interesting debate within the book community, especially for indie authors. While some authors have experienced success with this strategy, others have suggested it’s a waste of time.

Without long-term research performed on the benefits, authors should be open to trying any strategy that will help them promote and sell their book. Having said this, there is a time and place for using this strategy and hopefully, this article can help you decide if giving away free books is a strategy you want to try.

 

Here are 6 reasons why authors should be giving away free books

Galley Copies- During the writing process giving away galley copies to reviewers or editors is a common practice.

Book Reviews- one of the first steps in any book marketing campaign should be getting reviews. This process should start while the author is still writing the book and will continue well after the book is released. Using Kindle’s KDP program, for example, allows authors to give away free eBooks. A properly run giveaway will generate activity, give you a reason to communicate with your growing list of followers and should lead to book reviews.

Getting help with marketing- If authors hire anyone to help them with book marketing they should insist on having them read the book. It’s also a good idea for them to understand what the message is, why the book was written and the author’s goals.

Distributors or Resellers- when you are trying to create a relationship with resellers or distributors most will want a copy of the book along with a sell sheet and sales history. Your Genre- If you are releasing a book in a popular genre, you might want to try giving away free books to see if you can build a following, get reviews and spread the word. The more crowded a genre is, the more you will need to stand out.

Your family- getting the emotional support of your family is helpful and goes a long way. Authors should be proud of what they have created and share this journey with those that love them.

 

Here are 5 reasons why authors should not be giving away free books

• Most people love the idea of getting something for free. Giving away free books does not translate into expanding your audience and getting book reviews. In fact, a high percentage of free books don’t even get read.

• Giveaway programs usually cost money and take time and resources to set up properly. With any promotional opportunity, the author needs to generate a ‘buzz’ with their followers and target audience to get the proper response.

• While Goodreads and Amazon are popular platforms to promote books, both offer giveaways that require the author to mail a free, physical copy of the book. This can be costly and might not result in achieving the goals you set up.

• Giving away free books hurts the industry and dilutes the goal of being an author. Imagine if every author gave away their books for free.

• Having your book priced for free can lower the intrinsic value of the book. For example, if you have a self-help book that helps children control anger and manage stress, keeping the price of the book in line with other popular/strong selling titles makes this book seem more attractive than the one that is for free.

• When marketing a book, the author should be willing to try anything to help them achieve their goals. Giving away free books is just one of many marketing tools authors have at their disposal, however, taking full advantage of these tools is the key to a successful campaign.

If you decide to take advantage of a free giveaway, you should start with a low-cost one, experience what is involved with running a successful campaign and learn how it works. Talk to other authors, read about how to run a successful promotion and go for it! Rick Lite of Stress Free Book Marketing, stands at the forefront of the ever-changing book industry. He is a seasoned book marketing professional with over 13 years of experience in the industry. Rick’s expertise comes from tirelessly working on new and innovative ways to market his own books and CDs with his company and parent company, Stress Free Kids. Embracing the core values of integrity, innovation, and growth, Rick works closely with authors to create custom, robust book marketing programs. His easy-going manner provides “stress-free” support and comfort to authors going through the book marketing process for the first time. Rick is quick to share his knowledge and “insider tips” for a successful marketing campaign that will lead to increased exposure, awareness and most importantly, sales.

 

March 27, 2018 by Mike Shatzkin Originally appeared on The Shatzkin Files blog

Publishing and digital change consultant Bill Rosenblatt — always worth paying attention to — pointed his contacts last week to a podcast from NPR celebrating the current renaissance of independent bookstores. The history reported as part of what was really the celebration of very recent events is useful to ponder, even if it was sometimes a bit confused about the timing of mall stores and superstores and their impact on indies. But its memory wasn’t long enough to recall a critical development that is essential to understanding book retailing over the past half-century and what makes it possible to be a successful retailer of books today. And it elides the fact that indie bookstores have risen before, several decades ago.

The story the NPR report didn’t tell contains the kernal of a totally underappreciated fact of the book business. The first serious harnessing of the power of modern computing to improve the book supply ecosystem was by Ingram in the early 1970s. Ingram’s innovations over the past two decades, in what could be called the Amazon era, are critical elements of the modern book business infrastructure. Lightning’s print-on-demand capability and “third party fulfillment”, by which Ingram can turn any entity with a web address into an Internet bookseller, are the industry’s counterbalance to Amazon’s growth.

But the podcast, which focused on the recent rise of independent bookstores, would have benefited from an acknowledgment of the innovation by which Ingram dramatically changed book retailing nearly 50 years ago.

The central challenge of book retailing has always been to use the store’s limited shelf space and inventory investment dollars to have the best possible selection of books in the store. Before Ingram’s seminal innovation, publishers and retailers had a many-to-many supply chain with hundreds of publishers selling to thousands of stores. Wholesaling — stocking a warehouse that could provide books from many publishers — faced the same challenge. Wholesalers in those days were predominantly “local” — many of them had added a few trade books to their magazine and mass-market paperback selections.

But magazines and paperbacks were “forced out” — stocking decisions were made by the wholesaler not the customer — and then, after a while, just the covers of the magazines or paperbacks needed to be returned for credit. Inventory management wasn’t really an issue for the magazines and mass-market paperbacks. Trade books were really a different business.

The trade books were worth more to the wholesaler, unit for unit. When a title took off, the wholesaler could order a big shipment from the publisher and it got orders for the book quickly from local accounts. That’s where the money in book wholesaling was in those days, pumping the bestsellers, not “backing up” a store’s need for an additional copy here or there across the range of possible titles.

The fact that wholesalers stocked very few titles didn’t stop stores from trying to order what they needed from them. The net result was unsatisfactory for everybody. Wholesalers couldn’t fill most of the orders they got. Stores found resupply of anything except bestsellers from the local wholesaler to be time-consuming and inefficient. And the net result was that it was very hard to for most stores to match inventory to demand.

And that was a big part of the reason that independent bookstores had trouble competing with the mall store chains as they built out. They couldn’t compete with a better or more responsive selection of books because the supply chain inefficiencies, which included the fact that there were hardly any in-store stock tracking mechanisms in those days before personal computers, made that an insuperable challenge.

And then Ingram changed everything.

Harry Hoffman, who had been at tech company Bell & Howell before he came on board to run Ingram Book Company, clearly had a more tech-oriented management style than most book businesses did at that time. He built an efficient internal computer system to track Ingram’s inventory holdings and sales. This included an Ingram-generated “SKU” number (these were the days before every book reliably carried its own unique ISBN number) which they also used internally to “code” orders. But the big challenge to profitable wholesaling — the requirement to process more orders from customers that they could not fill than orders that they could fill — was not solved by that internal efficiency.

One day Hoffman entertained a former Bell & Howell colleague who showed him their new microfiche reader technology. The microfiche enabled the delivery of data on a piece of film that could be read by a projecting reader. Enormous amounts of data could be put delivered quickly and inexpensively by microfiche, if only the recipient had the “reader” machine to look at it. Hoffman and his team quickly grasped the potential benefits if a store placed its orders to Ingram with advance knowledge of what was in stock and what was not.

They hit on a formula. If the stores would pay the “rental” cost of having the reader (about $10 a month), then Ingram would deliver its complete inventory record to the stores weekly, including both the titles being stocked and the Ingram inventory as of when the microfiche was cut. The benefit to the store was that there was a high likelihood that their order would be filled (except for some titles whose stock had been depleted during the week.) That made Ingram their wholesaler of choice.

And to Ingram, the benefits were even greater than the increased volume of business. They no longer were processing reams of orders they couldn’t fill. And, as a bonus, they were able to put their internal SKU numbers into the microfiche as well, which meant the stores were able to do Ingram’s “order coding” when they created their orders. That cut costs for Ingram and increased the speed of fulfillment.

(This aspect of things seemed small to most people, but not to me. In the summer of 1966, I had a job working for Random House. What I did was “code orders”. I got the orders from the stores and looked up the internal Random House code in a directory. That’s what every filler-of-book-orders, including every publisher and every wholesaler, had to do when they got hard-copy orders from their accounts. It was tedious and expensive work that Ingram eliminated for themselves!)

It was this innovation by Ingram that actually spawned the first big uptick in the number of large and successful independent bookstores. Before Ingram’s microfiche, Baker & Taylor was the only “national” wholesaler, but their bailiwick was libraries, not bookstores. Libraries would wait for the books and, indeed, B&T did not stock big quantities of bestsellers to fulfill bookstore demand. But after Ingram showed the way, B&T scrambled to catch up. Before long, they’d imitated Ingram’s microfiche, although somewhat less successfully because their core internal systems weren’t as good.

For the next twenty years, until the mid-1990s, successful book retailing increasingly depended on delivering “selection”: larger and larger title counts in the stores. Big selections were the signal to the consumer that they would find what they wanted. With increasingly sophisticated communication with Ingram and B&T, stores could get most high-demand books in a day or two if they weren’t in stock. The mall stores and smaller independents suffered because their smaller selections were less of a magnet to the book shopper.

Then Amazon changed everything again, becoming the first store that carried every book and would tell you exactly how long it would take for you to get it. Of course, they did that leaning primarily on Ingram’s inventory and reliable service to deliver. But that’s another story.

Today’s indies rely on wholesalers, primarily Ingram, without a second thought. You won’t find a bookstore today that doesn’t order from wholesalers daily and depend on them for most of its stock. Whatever stocking or community or events strategy any book retailer employs, it is made possible by the ready availability of whatever books are needed to be delivered within hours.

So what we are celebrating today is actually The Rise Of Independent Bookstores Redux. The first time indies grew in importance, starting more than four decades ago, the foundations were size and selection. This time the main pillars are community and creation. But both times there was one company without which the thriving community of indies could not have happened. And that company is Ingram.

Ingram has been a consulting client on and off for years and I’m still engaged with them. This particular tale has been worth telling before, most recently a bit over two years ago., once almost a decade ago in the early days of this blog and once more than two decades ago in a speech I gave when Amazon was barely a year old!