Read the Latest News

Net Neutrality is a political hot button that is used to divided our nation even further. While we don’t want to get into the Republican vs Democrats points, what is critical is that this issue can cause Indie Authors, and even small press Authors to lose valuable sales.

With internet providers now being able to charge both the providers of content as well as those who receive the content, this gives them the ability to manipulate what you see. Not only is this a free Speech issue, but it also relates to if and how an Authors website is viewed. The providers can charge each individual website an extra fee to be able to be delivered to homes at the normal speed, and if you don’t pay, then you get downgraded to a slower speed, which let’s face it, this means the person downloading an authors site will give up waiting for it and move on. That means YOU LOSE!

In addition, the provider can charge more for a site to speed through their system and be delivered quickly and effortlessly. This, then gets passed on to the users of that system, such as Amazon sellers. More cuts into the profit margin of Authors and sellers.

This is BAD for everyone with higher costs to promote their products, means higher cost to purchase their products. Net neutrality from our perspective as small businesses is bad for everyone: Buyers and Sellers.

Publishers Weekly encouraging publishers to step up and fight the change that was implemented by the FCC last month. We encourage you as small businesses to step up and let your Congressmen know how it will affect you.

Below is an article that appeared in Publishers Weekly encouraging publishers to step up and fight the change that was implemented by the FCC last month. We encourage you as small businesses to step up and let your Congressmen know how it will affect you.

It’s Time for Publishers to Join the Fight for Net Neutrality

by Publishers Weekly | Jan 19, 2018

Supporters of net neutrality marked two important developments in recent days. On Tuesday, January 16, it was revealed that 50 senators have now committed to a bill that would block the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December repeal of net neutrality rules. In addition, as the New York Times reported, more than 20 states have now begun a battle in the courts to block the FCC’s repeal.

Codified by the FCC in 2015, net neutrality rules were created to keep Internet service providers from favoring certain websites or content over others. But, as the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Corynne McSherry explains, the FCC’s repeal last month now paves the way “for an Internet that works more like cable television;” a “pay-for-play” system where content providers could be forced to “negotiate with multiple ISPs to avoid their content being buried, degraded, or even blocked.”

Polls and public comments show the move to repeal net neutrality is broadly unpopular. It is also potentially dangerous. In comments to the FCC, a coalition of the nation’s top library associations stressed that preserving an open Internet is “essential to our nation’s freedom of speech.” And, in a letter to the FCC, 1,838 members of the Authors Guild demonstrated that American authors also unequivocally recognize the danger of the FCC’s action.

“As authors, we rely on the Internet to make our voices heard,” the guild letter states, concluding that the FCC’s repeal of net neutrality protections “will harm the free speech of American writers.”

But a key voice remains noticeably absent from the net neutrality debate: publishers. Despite widely expressed concerns that the FCC’s action could negatively impact free speech, and in contrast to concerted efforts to preserve net neutrality by others in the publishing ecosystem—including the library community, authors groups, and dozens of media and public advocacy organizations, including PEN America—the Association of American Publishers has yet to release a single statement on the issue and has taken no formal position.

We recognize that publishers and the AAP have limited resources and must prioritize the issues they choose to take on. However, supporting free speech is one of the AAP’s core policy areas. Which is why publishers can no longer sit this one out.

Following the FCC’s repeal, restoring net neutrality protections is going to be an uphill political battle. But it is not too late for publishers to stand up for free speech, and to stand with their readers, their authors, and the library community.

With the battle headed to Congress, now is the time to make that stand. AAP president and CEO Maria Pallante is widely known for her policy acumen and her relationships in Congress. And as widely recognized champions of free speech, a strong, unified statement from America’s book publishers can make a critical difference.